Chefs Gustavo Calderon, Robert Hohmann, Richard Doucette, and Eric Kaszubinski

Crisp, colorful vegetables will move from a supporting role to center stage on restaurant menus, and culturally eclectic menus will keep fusion in the fast lane, with chefs putting their own spin on Hawaiian poke in particular. These are just a few of the 2018 food and beverage trends shared with us by some of the top hotel and resort chefs in the U.S., who also let us know what trends they’re ready to see die (one even weighed in with a kitchen fashion “don’t”). Here are their thoughts on what’s hot and what’s not:

What’s Hot

“Healthy eating remains top of mind for diners, so dishes with vegetables as the main ingredient—pickled and fermented vegetables, in particular—will take center stage on menus. International flavors, like Korean and Hawaiian, have exploded. Poke, for example, has become super popular. I imagine chefs will continue to experiment with this traditional Hawaiian dish, recreating it and making it their own.”—Eric Kaszubinski, Executive Chef at Fort Lauderdale Marriott Pompano Beach Resort & Spa

“Veggies will be the star of the show in 2018. Bright, colorful vegetables will replace proteins as the main focus of an entrée. Cultural flavors will also make their way onto more menus. Diners are always looking for something new, so culturally eclectic menus with new and inspiring flavors will be important.”—Gustavo Calderon, Executive Chef, 3800 Ocean at Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa

“I think there will be a continuation of the local and seasonal trends. For us, this will include a lot more emphasis on preparing and serving what makes sense in the Northeast region of the US. In other words, not serving or featuring tomatoes in February, but working with our late fall crops to feature the produce that has been stored up. I also think we will see a resurgence in soups on menus, including flights of soups! This is an item that crosses the generations and provides a nostalgic memory for the millennial generation. In my opinion, sous vide/immersion cooking will make its way into more mainstream kitchens. It will also become easier to work with and less ‘scary’ for the amateur.”—Tom Kiernan, Executive Chef, Eleven Waters at Marriott Syracuse Downtown

“I’d like to see more slow foods and house-made charcuterie on 2018 menus. Fresh, local supplies are abundant here on Martha’s Vineyard and I feel it’s important to provide dishes that reflect the local community and environment. Making charcuterie in-house means we’re not depending on other entities to create the food we serve. It takes time, attention and traditional skills to execute.”—Richard Doucette, Executive Chef, Lighthouse Grill at Harbor View Hotel

“Low carb and low sugar diets. The use of more raw vegetables on menus. More use of roots and leaves to combat food wastage. Poke is a big trend. Cassava flour, too, because it’s gluten- and grain-free.”—Robert Hohmann, Executive Chef, Gaby Brasserie Française at Sofitel New York

“While fusion itself isn’t new, it’s bigger than ever and continues to find new forms of expression on menus.”—Adam Bechard, Executive Chef, KANU at Whiteface Lodge

What’s Not

“I think it’s time to see spherification go by the wayside. It is now overused in so many ways: from cocktails to desserts, hors d’oeuvres to salads. I also think that kale has finally run its course. With the most recent studies showing that the benefits of it were overhyped, we can now move on to another green.”—Tom Kiernan, Executive Chef, Eleven Waters at Marriott Syracuse Downtown

Sriracha is an overused ingredient, as are truffle oil and balsamic vinegar.”—Robert Hohmann, Executive Chef, Gaby Brasserie Française at Sofitel New York

Avocado toast is so overdone. On to bigger and better things!”—Gustavo Calderon, Executive Chef, 3800 Ocean at Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa

“I’d like to say goodbye to the cross-back apron trend. I find it impractical and favoring fashion over function. The classic apron has served us well for a very long time and for good reason—it works.”— Richard Doucette, Executive Chef, Lighthouse Grill at Harbor View Hotel

“I hope that false gluten-free claims will end. There are many people who claim celiac disease, but are really just on a carb-conscious diet. This creates much more work for the kitchen, instead of just requiring the removal of an ingredient or a substitution.”—Adam Bechard, Executive Chef, KANU at Whiteface Lodge